The run-up to the opening of the Princess Máxima Centre was a special time. Today, the third blog of a series in which we discuss the following question with the experts involved: how did the centre so quickly go from dream to reality in no more than 8 months?

“What do you need to put into what type of medical situation?”

“We only just began tackling the question of medical technology this past December 2017. Only a half year before the opening”, says Wilco Kleine, healthcare technology and innovation manager. At that time, there had not yet been a single thought about what the centre would need in this area. “What demands do we have to put into place regarding equipment? Which brands do we choose? How do we get the ultimately 3000 different types of medical devices delivered on time? Which healthcare professionals need what type of training to be able to work safely and efficiently with the equipment involved? And what if a device breaks down during use? These kinds of questions had not been answered until that moment. Which is why we had to go through the entire process quickly. “This was not easy, because it involves a lot of regulations and medical technology that directly affects patient care. For example, you can not just go out and buy a hospital device and install and use it.” Kleine: “You have to think carefully about what you need to do exactly for any medical situation that may arise. So we first determined which devices would fit in the new care processes, such as patient monitors. Afterwards, together with the healthcare professionals, we looked at the requirements that were set, which providers could supply the right equipment, and which configuration was best suited for our centre.”

“It was like shooting at moving targets”

The fact that everyone took care of a specific task during the transition period, especially within their own domain, did not always make it easier. “Everything had to be done quickly and therefore run simultaneously”, says Kleine. “In this context, it is very difficult to keep the various disciplines well-managed. IG & H participated in all program lines and monitored the coordination within the organisation, which was fully ensconced in the construction and set-up phase. There was a great added value in that.”

Arvid Glerum, consultant at IG&H, adds: “For us it was one of the biggest challenges to get everything done in time. At the organisational level, all sorts of things are so new and interesting that you want to share them, but we always had to weigh up: when is something just interesting to know and when is it critical?” Because everyone at the Prinses Máxima Centre was making choices at the same time in order to organise everything properly, there were a lot of mutual dependencies. For example, when something changed in the building, this had consequences for the technology needed, and vice versa. “It was like shooting at moving targets”, says Arvid. And Kleine agrees with this: “We have managed to keep a good grip on things by putting together a multidisciplinary group with which we have managed the whole process. This included representatives from all areas: from care to purchasing to technology. This made it easier to discuss developments with each other on a weekly basis. Arvid informed us about all the relevant developments in the other programs and provided us with progress reports with which we kept the entire transition organisation up-to-date.”

“Everything had to work out and everything had to be safe”

Because the subject of medical technology came relatively late on the agenda, the team encountered the necessary problems. That often required making swift decisions. “Once you have ordered a monitor, for example, there’s not much you can change”, says Kleine. “So there were times when we had to tell the organisation that it was really time for a final decision. In this way, we have also been able to set the framework.”

“Because some decisions were postponed, we often had to join forces with the suppliers”, says Arvid. “We once had a supplier show up at the door, having driven in his own car during the weekend, with equipment in the boot of his car.” Kleine thought it was nice to see that everyone came together in this success mode: “Everything had to work out and everything had to be safe. The equipment not only had to arrive on time, but also comply with all the regulations. The quality of care is indeed a precondition for the centre.”

The balance that was established provided a solid framework. We mapped the risks and determined how we would tackle them. “We opted for a more pragmatic approach for less risky systems, while we used very detailed procedures for high-risk systems”, Kleine explains. “We have done everything neatly and meticulously, but without the stagnating bureaucracy that you often encounter in existing hospitals.”

“Hands-on, a-typical, successful: the process was unique”

The Princess Máxima Centre attaches great importance to keeping patients mobile. This was the mentality throughout the entire process. Kleine: “The patient must go through the care process smoothly. For children, it is very important for them to be able to move around and get out of their room. The centre works with innovative care concepts, which we had to design technologically during the transition.” Because the opening date of 18 May was rapidly approaching and medical equipment normally had delivery periods of a few months, the team had to act quickly: “We have organised the medical technology in such a way that the centre is ready for innovative care concepts, now and in the future. For example, we have ensured that nurses can monitor all the vital parameters of patients remotely, via smartphones, and even watch them live on monitors. But perhaps the most important thing is that patients are actually mobile now!”

Another important and complex part of the project was the training of health care professionals. Starting up with a completely new organisation has had its share of challenges, but also unique opportunities. For example, through transition meetings we have been able to train all doctors’ assistants, nurses, and medical specialists on all the risky equipment and critical work processes. Even before they started working in patient care. Super-users have also been given extra training and brought into the position for providing support at the workplace, as well as training new colleagues in the future. In fully operational hospitals this is often difficult to manage.

Both Kleine and Arvid proudly look back on a fantastic process. Because of the hands-on mentality and solidarity within the collaboration, but also because it has been a very a-typical experience in hospital care. “Within a ‘pressure cooker setting’ we achieved a solid, final result in a very short time”, says Arvid. “The entire centre, from the doctors to the employees, really came together in the final weeks. Together we rolled up our sleeves. It was very special to see and experience that.”

“We have built a centre completely from scratch: a new organisation, in a new building, with new stuff”, adds Kleine. “We had a successful dynamic with each other, throughout the entire transition. And we achieved this through a combination of being able to shift gears quickly when necessary and maintaining an organisation-wide view when making decisions. It was a wonderful, unique, and inspiring experience.”

Bart ter Horst

Author Bart ter Horst

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